Posts tagged "cooking quality pork"

High Quality Pork and Beans

I thought that I’d test out my new HD Camcorder with drums to see what it sounds like. Tell me what ya think..

Duration : 0:2:17

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Posted by mark - April 30, 2017 at 3:48 am

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real meat versus canned food?

I have two 9-week-old kittens. They are currently on wet food about 5 times a day. They have dry food out all the time that they nibble on. Water is provided which they are drinking.

They are currently being weaned off Whiskas and Felix wet food (which they were fed in foster care) and onto a higher quality wet food. I am mixing some Pets at Home (UK) "Purely" food which seems better quality. It has 50% real chicken, sunflower oil, vitamin and mineral supplements and tapioca starch. That’s the list of ingredients. It seems better than other brands. There doesn’t seem to be any byproducts or ash or corn fillers.

The kittens don’t seem to enjoy this food that much (both higher and lower quality food), but they will pick at it. A couple of times I have given them some salmon steaks and frying steak (both cooked) which I’ve chopped up. They love this and lick the plate clean!

My question is, is it wrong/safe/unhealthy to feed them exclusively real meat (beef, pork, tuna etc) as opposed to high quality canned food? I know that canned food has all the vitamins and minerals, etc that a cat needs, but is real meat actually better for them since they are carnivores? I am a little worried about them having too much protein in their diet as I know this can cause kidney problems. Also, because they are so young, is real meat appropriate? I would not feed them processed meats (ham, deli meat etc). I know that canned food contains water, but they are drinking pretty well too.

I want to give my kittens a good start in life and feed them the best.
Thanks for the answers I’ve been getting. So, what about if I give them a combination of real and canned food, all mixed in together. The real meat might make the canned stuff taste better. But then again, they might just pick out the real stuff and leave the canned stuff!

A raw diet is the best thing you could possibly feed them. They are obligate carnivores and designed to digest high protein foods, so you needn’t worry about kidney problems. Meat contains water just like canned food does.

Making a nutritionally complete homemade diet isn’t easy. Research:
http://www.catinfo.org/makingcatfood.htm (MAKING CAT FOOD)
http://www.catnutrition.org/foodmaking.php (Foodmaking)
http://www.littlebigcat.com/index.php?action=library&act=show&item=014 (Easy Homemade Diets for Cats and Dogs)

Raw feeding is an excellent option but should also be thoroughly researched before being attempted. There’s a lot more to it than just feeding your cat raw meat. You need a careful balance of raw muscle meat, raw organ meat, and raw meaty bones. Research:
http://www.rawfedcats.org/ (Raw Fed Cats)
http://rawfed.com/myths/cats.html (Raw Fed: What About Cats?)
http://www.rawlearning.com/ (Jane Anderson’s Raw Learning Site)
http://www.rawmeatybones.com/ (Raw Meaty Bones)
http://rawfed.com/myths/preymodel.html (Raw Prey Model Diet Vs. BARF Diet)
http://community.livejournal.com/rawdogs/profile/ (Raw Dogs Livejournal Community [not just for dogs despite the name!], excellent raw feeding information on the profile page and overall helpful community for raw feeding questions.)
http://www.rawfed.com/myths/index.html (Myths About Raw Feeding)

Darksong~

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Posted by mark - March 26, 2017 at 10:28 am

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Best meat protein scale?

Are some animal protein (flesh) better than others?
I was discussing with an Egyptian collegue has insisted that theres an animal protien ranking, with fish, chicken, beef towards the top and pork at the bottom.

Besides the obvious religious prohibitions, is there good evidence that pork is considered a poor quality protein
[*fat notwithstanding-lean pork; lean beef; lean chicken etc….]

ive never heard of lean pork. but yes lean meats usually are the best. (pork and beef don’t regularly exist as lean untill after processing – i think)
Lean meat is just the muscle. turkey chicken and fish are the top choices.

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Posted by mark - March 18, 2017 at 3:25 pm

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Find Out Where You Can Learn to Make Your Favorite Dishes at Cooking Schools?

Thai cuisine has gained popularity all over the world for its fresh flavours, healthy ingredients and low fat cooking methods for help visit www.cat-head-biscuit.com. At one time recipes in Thailand were divided between those for the royal court (which were kept secret) and those for commoners. Now royal and everyday recipes have mingled but there are still significant regional differences.

In the north of Thailand glutinous rice is favoured over steamed rice and it is kneaded into small balls with the fingers and used to soak up liquid dishes. Northern curries have a milder, more herbal quality thanthose in the south. Curries are flavoured with ginger, tamarind and turmeric. Preserved fruits and pickled vegetables are popular accompaniments. The traditional meal served when entertaining in the north is a Khantok dinner. Khan meaning bowl and tok meaning a low round table. Guests sit on the floor around the table and help themselves to a variety of dishes which may include rice, fried chicken, a curry, a minced meat dish and a salad. The north is famous for longans (a lychee-like fruit) when in season.

In the south coconut features in many dishes and locally grown cashew nuts are eaten as appetisers or stir-fried with chicken and dried chillis. As you may expect, there is an abundance of seafood. Around the Gulf of Thailand shellfish are farmed and so they are very fresh. Whole fish are sometimes brought to the table still poaching in heavily seasoned stock over a charcoal burner. The result is pleasantly aromatic rather than intensely spicy.

However, the type of cuisine with which we are most familiar comes from the central region of Thailand and dates from the early 13th century when the first independent Thai capital was located at Sukhothai. The basic diet consisted of rice, fish and vegetables flavoured with black pepper and fish sauce, along with fresh fruits. When power later transferred south to Ayuthaya other ingredients such as coriander, lime and tomato were added to the diet, along with what has become an essential ingredient – chilli pepper. Other influences came from India, Japan, Persia and China.
Thai Cooking Classes
Northern Thailand

The internationally renowned Chiang Mai Thai Cookery School is owned and run by Sompon Nabnian, Thailand’s international TV chef, and his wife Elizabeth. Stay and Study packages are offered at the Jasmine Rice Village which is operated by the owners of the Chiang Mai Thai Cookery School for help visit www.150-venison-recipes.com. “A half hour’s drive from Chiang Mai city centre, Jasmine Rice Village Boutique Resort and Spa offers a unique experience for visitors seeking tranquility, cultural authenticity and luxurious comfort during their stay in the north of Thailand”.

1-5 day classes are offered. A one-day class costs 990 Baht (33 USD) per person.
Southern Thailand

At Mom Tri’s Boathouse in Phuket, Gourmet Executive Chef Tummanoon Punchun shares the secrets of great Thai cooking at popular workshops held every Saturday and Sunday from 10.00 to about 14.00. The course includes a folder of recipes, a Boathouse apron and lunch. Excellent beach front resort accommodation is available.

2 day class costs 3,200 Baht (105 USD) per person.
Central Thailand

From Bangkok, The Thai House is a forty minute long-boat trip through the villages along Klong Bangkok Noi. Owned by a Thai family, this beautiful, traditional teak house is surrounded by gardens with tropical fruit trees and its own herb garden. Homestay accommodation is available in guestrooms around an upstairs courtyard. Pip, your instructor, learned to cook from the highest possible authority – her mother.

1-3 day classes are offered. A one-day class costs 3,500 Baht (115 USD) per person

Typical one-day course at The Thai House includes:

An introduction to Thai herbs and spices

Appetizer: Larb Moo – A spicy Thai pork salad

Soup: Tom Yam Kung – Hot and sour prawn soup

Luncheon Dish: Phad Thai – Thai fried noodles

Main Dishes: Kaeng Ka-Ri Kai – Yellow chicken curry and Paneang Nua – Coconut Beef Curry

boparaisk
http://www.articlesbase.com/recipes-articles/find-out-where-you-can-learn-to-make-your-favorite-dishes-at-cooking-schools-714341.html

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Posted by mark - February 23, 2017 at 2:16 am

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Do you think that a Kosher diet is better for you?

Isn’t kosher meat supposed to have no fillers?
And isn’t usually better quality, since its a higher pricing. ?
And pork and pig is usually bad for you, or at least the way we make it. Do you think keeping it out of your diet (kosher) is good for you too?

Scientific proof please? Like info about fats, fillers. Thanks

Kosher is preparation, other than no swine the food isn’t any better or worse.

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Posted by mark - January 12, 2017 at 4:16 am

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Korean grilled pork belly BBQ (“samgyeopsal”)

How to make this popular BBQ dish – the full recipe is on my website http://www.maangchi.com/recipe/samgyeopsal-gui

Duration : 0:10:44

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Posted by mark - June 4, 2016 at 3:36 am

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Can Meat be a Health Hazard

Authors note: This article is intended for those who currently consume commercially raised meat (that includes chicken, fish, lamb, pork, beef…) and processed meat products.

Picture this: you are standing at the shelf of your local supermarket looking at the chickens and thinking “which one shall I buy?”. Does it really make a difference? You could buy two of those normal chickens for the same price as that free range organic one? In the following article I wish to outline some reasons as to why I recommend paying extra for a higher quality and ethical product.

Commercial Meat – a health hazard

Not all meat you buy is the same. Commercial meat production has sadly through greed and corruption turned a healthy product into a health hazard. Not to mention an animal welfare disgrace. This is far from an exaggeration. Commercial animals are kept in confined, cramped pens, given growth hormones to speed their delivery to the abattoir, antibiotics to stop the spread of disease from their conditions, and even fed products like genetically modified soy (mostly grown in Brazil at the expense of the Amazon rainforest) that given to humans in light of current research is very dangerous to health!

Antibiotics everywhere

Each year, in the U.S. alone farmers dump over 9 million pounds of antibiotics into the food and water supply of farm animals. This however is not intended to primarily fight or prevent disease but to fatten up livestock, which is sadly a side effect of the antibiotics (1). Grains (often contaminated with fungus or fungicides) are also used to fatten up livestock at the expense of the traditional and healthy grass feed.

Processed meats and cancer

A recent report from the Journal of the National Cancer Institute on the dangers of eating processed meats (including bacon, sausage, hot dogs, salami, ham, and smoked or cured meat) concluded that by adding 1 ounce of processed meat to your daily diet elevates your stomach cancer risks by as much as 38 %. The review looked at 40 years worth of studies on the relationship between these meats and stomach cancer (cited in www.mercola.com)

What about those dangerous saturated fats you ask?

Here are some “interesting” facts:

– Between 1910 and 1970: animal fat consumption decreased from 83% to 62%

– Butter consumption decreased from 18 pounds to 4 pounds per year

– Margarine, shortening and refined oils consumption increased 400%

– Today, CHD (Coronary Heart Disease) causes at least 40% of all U.S. deaths (2)

– The fatty acids found in arterial clogs are mostly unsaturated (74%) of which 41% are polyunsaturated (3)

Could nature has designed a product like breast milk with so many saturated fats like butyric, caproic, caprylic, capric, lauric, myristic, palmitic and stearic acids? Breast milk is the source of nourishment to ensure the growth, development and survival of children. Do you see the discrepancy in that? Unfortunately all the studies that point to saturated fat as the culprit put deadly man-made trans fatty acids in the mix.

To learn more on the truth of saturated fats and the real killer trans fatty acids I recommend you read my previous article “Fat facts: good guys or bad guys”. (2)

I hope this article has given you a strong enough reason to believe that paying extra as often as possible for a healthy, ethical, free range, hormone free and unprocessed meat product is really worth it.

Finally check out this short cartoon parody based on the Matrix Movies to see the truth behind commercial meat production: www.meatrix.com.

Your 3D Coach

Craig Burton

References

1 Wolcott, W. The metabolic typing diet, 2000, Broadway books.

2 Burton , C., Fat Facts – Good Guys or Bad Guys?, www.3dpts.com

3 Lancet, 1994, 344:1195

Craig Burton
http://www.articlesbase.com/health-articles/can-meat-be-a-health-hazard-211009.html

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Posted by mark - January 28, 2016 at 2:25 am

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How to bake pork chops?

Take a good quality pork chop
I asked in another question what a good pork chop recipe was and this one sounded delicious….

ritz crackers crushed add a little garlic powder, season salt, pepper …dip your chops in beaten eggs..than roll in the ritz cracker mix..put in baking dish with melted butter or marg. and bake at 350 for 45 mins uncovered!! These are to die for..So moist and juicy and the cracker mix is incredible….Serve with potatoe of your choice

My question is, do I just put enough butter to cover the bottom!?
And how big should the chops be?
And should they have a bone!?

Bone in is very tender*

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Posted by mark - May 5, 2011 at 10:58 am

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