Posts tagged "beef"

Cooking BBQ Beef Ribs with Cumbraes Butcher Jerry Meneses

Join Cumbraes Jerry Meneses as he gives you cooking instructions for BBQ Beef Ribs.

The Cumbrae’s tradition of farm-to-fork quality started over a decade ago when third-generation butcher Stephen Alexander first brought Cumbrae Farms’ naturally raised meats to Toronto’s food connoisseurs.

Cumbrae’s has become Toronto’s meeting place for people who love to buy, prepare and eat great food. For leading chefs, ardent connoisseurs and families who value quality, Cumbrae’s enthusiastic staff set the standard for personal service, great cooking advice and true enjoyment of food.

Read more about Cumbraes farm-to-fork philosophy at

Created by Neil Mills and Stephen Alexander

Duration : 0:4:2

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Posted by mark - November 14, 2015 at 6:56 pm

Categories: Cooking Quality Meats   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Beef Hindquarter Sirloin Primal Removal and Preparation

c 2010 Quality Meat Scotland

Duration : 0:3:0

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Posted by mark - November 13, 2015 at 6:43 pm

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Baron of Beef compared to Prime Rib???

We are planning an awards banquet and went out for price quotes for the catering. One client proposed serving Baron of Beef instead of Prime Rib to save money. I’m not sure that I have ever had this cut, but they told us it compares to Prime Rib. Does anyone have any experience with this cut versus Prime Rib? Would it be a mistake to "downgrade" to baron of beef to save money?

BARON OF BEEF: A descriptive name of bone-in beef round items from IMPS/NAMP 160 to 166B that are generally of large size and used for roasting. Also referred to as Steamship Round.

“PRIME” RIB: Generic description that refers to a bone-in or boneless beef rib roast. As a generic description, it does not refer to the quality grade of the roast.

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Posted by mark - November 12, 2015 at 5:38 pm

Categories: Prime Beef   Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Steak- What do you Recommend And Why?

Can anyone explain to me the quality, taste, cost etc. of different types of steak? I don’t really know anything about meat quality, but I want to get the highest quality steak (for a reasonable price) for my dad’s birthday. I’m looking at Omaha Steaks and I just realized I have no idea what to look for! What would you recommend and why? Also, what would be the most impressive?

My dad loves to cook and barbecue, but he’s cheap so I’m ordering him expensive marinated meat– so no restaurant recommendations please! :)

I want to know about:

1) Filet Mignon
2) Prime Rib
3) Sirloin
4) T-bone
5) Strip Steak
6) Rib-eye

If he likes his steaks well-done, you may want to stick with the Rib-eye; it has a higher fat content therefore will retain more moisture and flavor. If he is eating his steak at a medium or more rare doneness then I would recommend the Filet Mignon or Porterhouse (most expensive, readily available cuts). I personally think Porterhouse has more flavor and a good combination of meat with the bone-in and you get a piece of Filet Mignon on one side of the bone and a Strip Steak on the other side of the bone ( I save the super tender Filet side to eat last). So obviously, a more economical but still yummy steak is a Strip Steak. Rib-eye, T-bone and Sirloin are OK and just a note on Prime Rib; cooking time would be a good bit longer (larger cut of meat) and is generally served with a very pink center (rare to med rare) if that is a concern for his meat-eating preferences

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Posted by mark - November 9, 2015 at 4:01 pm

Categories: Cooking Quality Meats   Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Why did my chicken come out rubbery?

My first time making baked chicken…. I seasoned it, put 4 legs in a Pyrex pan thing and cooked them for 1 hour at 390 degrees…. 30 mins on each side… they are tough and rubbery….. not easily falling off the bone like normal… what did i do wrong? Could it be the meat quality?

slow and low is the key. Season them, put them on a baking sheet, or a pyrex pan, whichever, but add a little water in the bottom. this will keep them moist while cooking. Bake them at 350 degrees for about 20 minutes, and check them. If you have a probe thermometer, check the temperature, it should be at 160 degrees when you take them out. There is no need to turn them, they will cook evenly enough. Once you take them out, let them sit a minute or two, then serve! They should turn out alot better. Don’t ever cook chicken at 390, that is way too high and it cooks the chicken too fast, drying the meat out. And keeping it in for an hour definitely took all the moisture out, no wonder it turned out rubbery! I hope this helps, and I hope your chicken turns out delicious!

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Posted by mark - November 8, 2015 at 3:50 pm

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South Korea says it may rework a US beef deal

Anna Chan:
South Korea’s prime minister says he’s left the door open to revising a U.S. beef import deal. Many believe that Seoul agreed to the pact to please Washington… despite safety concerns. We now go to
Seoul for more.

Next Thursday South Korea resumes quarantine inspections on all cuts of U.S. beef from animals of any age. No U.S. beef has been imported here since 2003 following an outbreak of mad cow disease.

South Korea’s government says they will be watching the imports carefully.

[Han Seung-soo, South Korean Prime Minister]:
“We will suspend the beef imports (from the U.S.) if our people’s health is in danger with an outbreak of mad cow disease in America.”

Last month South Korea agreed to open its market to American beef.

South Koreans have taken to the streets in protest. They’ve been listening to the quickly spreading rumors that products such as diapers and cosmetics may pose a risk for mad cow disease because beef products are used in their production.

The government says U.S. beef is safe. To help prove their claims they brought in scientists to knock down some of the claims.

South Korea used to be the third-largest import market for U.S. beef.

Duration : 0:1:23

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Posted by mark - October 24, 2015 at 7:52 am

Categories: Prime Beef   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Cuisinart Rotisserie 4 lb Ribeye Roast to Prime Rib

This time I use he Cuisinart Rotisserie to roast a 3.99 a pound 4 1/2 lb bone in ribeye roast. It turns the roast in to some tasty mouth watering prime rib. Just tie the roast, cook to 135 probing often not to over cook. After it hits 135 let it rest for 15 min and serve. For added flavor coat in olive oil and a nice beef rub for four our more hours prior to roasting.

Duration : 0:5:1

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Posted by mark - October 18, 2015 at 4:22 am

Categories: Prime Beef   Tags: , , , , , , , ,

where do you guys buy your meats? legs of lamb, beef steak etc,’?

We have been going to Coles and Woolies and buying fillet steak not the cheap rump or stuff, and legs of lamb for $20 and getting them home cooking them (searing not stewing steaks) (cooking roasts at 180 for at least 2 hours) and they are tough like rubber. We had a bbq with family and spent considerable money for a pre chrissy get together.

Such a rip off and such bad quality. I know most of the stuff sold in supermarkets is mutton not actual lamb. I have heard about market farmers where you can order farm fresh produce online. Has anyone done this if so what are the good places/companies and how much does it cost? I am assuming its more.

Thanks merry Christmas everyone!
Wow one person actually gave me some half decent info. Nobody gave me a website except her and even if i wanted to buy from there I am not in that area. BTW First guy its not a forum for you to be telling me I overcook food. Its the butchers fault for selling shite food. At astronomical prices.

I buy the organic beef & lamb from Woolworth’s & sometimes I order free range lamb online from farmer dave His lamb is beautiful, I usually get a leg of lamb & butterfly it so it is flat, marinade it in olive oil, garlic, sea salt & rosemary overnight & cook it on a hot bbq.

I really recommend buying organic & free range meat, the taste & quality is far superior & if better for the environment & your body.

I would also suggest you slow cook your beef & lamb, I have never had a roast go rubbery. Seal them first in a hot pan & place in an oven at 250c then turn down to 150c after 20 minutes. for about a 3kg roast you would slow cook for 2.5-3 hours (I recommend using a meat thermometer to test when its cooked.

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Posted by mark - September 25, 2015 at 4:11 pm

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Great Prime rib in the bay area?

Have already tried House of prime rib and Broadway Prime.
Beef its whats for dinner!!!
Thanks for the advise.

Sundance Steak House in Palo Alto. It’s on El Camino, across the street from Stanford University.

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Posted by mark - September 23, 2015 at 3:51 pm

Categories: Prime Beef   Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Grade and Specification of Menage Beef

Chef Flynn is in his kitchen cooking Menage beef and educating us about USDA grade and specifications. You may not know that there is more to quality meats than USDA grade. Chef Flynn is cluinary trained at Wales and Johnson. He is an Executive Research Chef.

Duration : 0:5:27

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Posted by mark - September 21, 2015 at 2:07 pm

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