Home » Quality Pork » How to get cooked meat to be tender?

How to get cooked meat to be tender?

Occasionally a piece of meat, pork, beef or lamb, no matter how well cooked will be tough because it was bad quality to begin with, coming probably from an old animal well past its prime (I know what cuts of beef must be boiled, roasted or fried so that’s not a problem).

But if starting from good meat what are the tips and advice for cooking it tender? As I understand a bad cooking method can make even the best quality meat tough like leather.

slow cook it. you can do it in the oven without a slow cooker. i do london broil at 275 for 4 hours (after searing it on the stove) and i almost cover it with water. then i make a gravy out of the water after it is cooked. mmmm delicious and it falls apart.

also, after cooking meat, cut it against the grain. it is easier to chew.

13 thoughts on “How to get cooked meat to be tender?

  1. white gravy says:

    to make any meat tender its no secret. Moisture, slow cooking and low temperature.

    Slow and low and add some water, wine, broth, etc.
    References :

  2. Chad N says:

    For me the key is cooking lo and slow
    References :

  3. distorted_sunshine says:

    cook it slow, or sear the outsides at high temperatures and slow cook the rest of the way to seal in juices. marinating also helps, my favorite is chicken breasts in italian salad dressing. they are the most tender and juicy when soaked for over 3 hours. also, cook most of the way and let it sit. the heat trapped in the meat will continue cooking it even without a heat source, and because it is slower and gentler, the meat will be more tender.
    References :

  4. shirls says:

    a pressure cooker makes meat slide off the bone its so tender
    References :

  5. d says:

    by tenderizing it
    References :

  6. danamike113 says:

    slow cook it. you can do it in the oven without a slow cooker. i do london broil at 275 for 4 hours (after searing it on the stove) and i almost cover it with water. then i make a gravy out of the water after it is cooked. mmmm delicious and it falls apart.

    also, after cooking meat, cut it against the grain. it is easier to chew.
    References :

  7. cz73kz says:

    Do it in the slow cooker, smoker, or roast it low for a long time.

    If you are doing it any other way, and cooking it well done, it is most likely not going to be tender. Keeping it at least a little pink in the middle will make it much more tender.

    Also, make sure that you wait 10-15 minutes after cooking before cutting the meat, to keep the juices in.
    References :

  8. Erika L says:

    I put all my meats (beef, pork lamb) in the slow cooker, Usually put it on a low setting and cook for 7 hours or so. Comes out so tender you can barely get it out with a fork because its falling off.
    References :

  9. Robert says:

    The best way to insure that meats come out "perfect" is to purchase an instant read meat thermometer. The better ones have a list of temperatures for each type of meat – beef, pork, chicken etc. Cook the protein to the recommended internal temperature and you can’t go wrong.
    References :

  10. jess says:

    Brown it off then stew it. Meaning add liquid to it and cook slowly in the oven.
    References :

  11. Esmerelda says:

    You don’t have to slow cook to get tender. The trick is not to overcook. I learned to cook some less tender cuts of beef like an eye of round by searing quickly in a cast iron skillet and then popping it into a very hot oven – say 400 or even 450 degrees and then monitoring temperature with a probe thermometer. Depending on your preference for "doneness" you would take it out when it reaches about 145 for rare, 150 for medium and 155 for well. Chickens I roast temperature at 325 until the breast is up to about 160 to 165.

    The secret is letting the meat rest before carving for anywhere from 5 to 15 minutes – a steak for 5, a small roast for 10, a large roast or chicken for 15. It allows the meat to finish cooking and the juices to be reabsorbed so the meat is juicy when cut. It always comes out great.

    I do use slow cooking or braising for things like pot roast or pork ribs. I do ribs for at least 3 hours starting out at 350 for a half hour and then turning it down to 250 for the rest of the time. A pot roast takes about the same amount as the ribs only in a dutch oven on the stove at least half submerged in broth, wine and onions.

    If you want a really good book that covers this very subject, Alton Brown’s "I’m Just Here for the Food" is terrific!
    References :

  12. tbunny90 says:

    Marinate your meat overnight or at least for a couple of hours if you can.
    Buttermilk is a great choice for a marinade because it makes meat (especially chicken) moist and juicy.
    Also, there are a ton of bottled marinades on the market right now so it’s super easy.
    References :

  13. swf36D says:

    Certain cuts of meat are going to be tough. You need to braise those cuts in some sort of liquid and some kind of acid. Tomatoes, wine, citrus, all will add acidity to help break down the fibers in the meat. A crock pot is ideal for this kind of cooking.
    References :

Comments are closed.