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Can Meat be a Health Hazard

Authors note: This article is intended for those who currently consume commercially raised meat (that includes chicken, fish, lamb, pork, beef…) and processed meat products.

Picture this: you are standing at the shelf of your local supermarket looking at the chickens and thinking “which one shall I buy?”. Does it really make a difference? You could buy two of those normal chickens for the same price as that free range organic one? In the following article I wish to outline some reasons as to why I recommend paying extra for a higher quality and ethical product.

Commercial Meat – a health hazard

Not all meat you buy is the same. Commercial meat production has sadly through greed and corruption turned a healthy product into a health hazard. Not to mention an animal welfare disgrace. This is far from an exaggeration. Commercial animals are kept in confined, cramped pens, given growth hormones to speed their delivery to the abattoir, antibiotics to stop the spread of disease from their conditions, and even fed products like genetically modified soy (mostly grown in Brazil at the expense of the Amazon rainforest) that given to humans in light of current research is very dangerous to health!

Antibiotics everywhere

Each year, in the U.S. alone farmers dump over 9 million pounds of antibiotics into the food and water supply of farm animals. This however is not intended to primarily fight or prevent disease but to fatten up livestock, which is sadly a side effect of the antibiotics (1). Grains (often contaminated with fungus or fungicides) are also used to fatten up livestock at the expense of the traditional and healthy grass feed.

Processed meats and cancer

A recent report from the Journal of the National Cancer Institute on the dangers of eating processed meats (including bacon, sausage, hot dogs, salami, ham, and smoked or cured meat) concluded that by adding 1 ounce of processed meat to your daily diet elevates your stomach cancer risks by as much as 38 %. The review looked at 40 years worth of studies on the relationship between these meats and stomach cancer (cited in www.mercola.com)

What about those dangerous saturated fats you ask?

Here are some “interesting” facts:

– Between 1910 and 1970: animal fat consumption decreased from 83% to 62%

– Butter consumption decreased from 18 pounds to 4 pounds per year

– Margarine, shortening and refined oils consumption increased 400%

– Today, CHD (Coronary Heart Disease) causes at least 40% of all U.S. deaths (2)

– The fatty acids found in arterial clogs are mostly unsaturated (74%) of which 41% are polyunsaturated (3)

Could nature has designed a product like breast milk with so many saturated fats like butyric, caproic, caprylic, capric, lauric, myristic, palmitic and stearic acids? Breast milk is the source of nourishment to ensure the growth, development and survival of children. Do you see the discrepancy in that? Unfortunately all the studies that point to saturated fat as the culprit put deadly man-made trans fatty acids in the mix.

To learn more on the truth of saturated fats and the real killer trans fatty acids I recommend you read my previous article “Fat facts: good guys or bad guys”. (2)

I hope this article has given you a strong enough reason to believe that paying extra as often as possible for a healthy, ethical, free range, hormone free and unprocessed meat product is really worth it.

Finally check out this short cartoon parody based on the Matrix Movies to see the truth behind commercial meat production: www.meatrix.com.

Your 3D Coach

Craig Burton

References

1 Wolcott, W. The metabolic typing diet, 2000, Broadway books.

2 Burton , C., Fat Facts – Good Guys or Bad Guys?, www.3dpts.com

3 Lancet, 1994, 344:1195

Craig Burton
http://www.articlesbase.com/health-articles/can-meat-be-a-health-hazard-211009.html

16 thoughts on “Can Meat be a Health Hazard

  1. Lyttleton W says:

    Is red meat a health hazard, especially for someone who has had a problem with their heart?

  2. michael b says:

    we are carnivore’s….of course red meat isn’t bad for you…..man as been eating it since the year dot…two thumbs down …well to all you carrot crunchers my steaks under the grill….mmm yummy
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  3. Tony says:

    red meats are high in chorosterol. If you had a heart problem i wouldnt recommend eating red meats. Go for white meat like fish and chicken and try to put more vegetables.
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  4. tomcat72667 says:

    yup
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  5. Solange B says:

    Yes.

    .
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  6. Huge says:

    Too much of anything is bad for you, rather than what you are eating. In particular, food with a high fat content eaten every day will have long term health implications. Lean red meat is good for you as long as your body digests it okay (as you get older the gut slows down).
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  7. Bev says:

    red meat itself isnt a problem although it does supposedly increase your risk of colon cancer.

    it depends what the problem is with the heart …..its the fat on the meat that is the concern for heart attack sufferers and indeed for anyone who wants to cut down on saturated fat.

    saturated fat is not good for anyone.

    However, red meat alone should not be a risk to anyone its a combination of things, diet, health and lifestyle.

    everything in moderation

    unless your doctor tells you differently
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  8. Pippo says:

    No, if it is lean meat.
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  9. annie says:

    It is harder for your body to digest red meat than say chicken or fish. The fat on red meat is very bad for you too so if you really want to continue eating it, it should be the very lean variety.
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  10. FRANK M says:

    This is what I asked my cardiologist and nothing is banned as long as it is in moderation.When at training school for the Ambulance Service,Anything taken in sufficient quantity can harm us,even water.
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  11. ALEX K says:

    yes it is bad for you if you have too much, eaten in moderation it is fine, it has a high fat content, so it is probably bad for the ticker, i remember trying to browning a wee portion of mince, you know the packets you get for about a £1, it was just under a half pint of fat that came out that, that was using a george foreman grill, a lesson to be learned, always grill your food, especially if it is red meat
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  12. sarch_uk says:

    Red meat tends to contain a great deal of saturated fat which is the stuff that builds up in your artery’s as plaque and is therefore bad for your heart and your cholesterol levels. As a previous answerer said, white meat and fish would be much better for your heart.
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  13. Smiley says:

    Lean red meat like steak can be eaten once a week the rest should be fish, (not shell fish) turkey and chicken. Meats like liver and or processed meats like sausages, puddings and pate or duck should be avoided not only due to their cholesterol content but also due to the fat content and more importantly how they react to some of todays’ heart drugs.
    I believe you should not ban any food but instead eat in moderation once in a while a little of something is not going to kill you but you must exercise and eat well around the food you should curtail.
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  14. Crazy Diamond says:

    Try not to eat it more than once a week and make sure all the visible fat is trimmed off (NO MINCE to fatty) I take it you are on statins for cholesterol. This is what they told me.
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  15. Dc3402 says:

    Yes, some worse than others. There is no reason you can’t eat it, but stick with the low fat cuts and keep it to one serving on an occasional basis.

    What is a serving? No bigger than the palm of your hand and no thicker than a deck of cards.

    You might want to check out the American Heart Association cookbook. I’m sure your local library has a copy. If you like it you can get the paperback version at any large bookstore.
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  16. brownsuga says:

    no, just make sure its real lean. and cooked at the proper temp to avoid any kind of bacteria.
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