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Where can you get "Prime Rib of Beef" in London ?

Wher can you get that magnificent American cut of beef "Prime Rib" in London? I have been told that British butchers cut the animal in a different way from American so the "Prime Rib" cut (usually on the bone) isn’t avialable. Anyobe know a restaurant where it is?
Malta

Thanks for your answer. I agree. Perhaps those who think that it is obtainable don’t quite know what it is! Anyone out there – please help!!
Prime Rib to me is not really conventionally "steak". There is a good desciption of it on Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prime_Rib

OK – over to you all again. Wher can I get it in London??!!
10 points up for grabs! So far the recommendations have drawn a blank. The restaurants suggested don’t do Prime Rib. The butcher recommendation was good – but I don’t want to cook myslef! I want a good chef in a good restaurant to do me a Prime Rib !

Try the oldest pub/restaurant in London – Rules – went there the other day and my friend had Rib of Beef – looked spectacular!!! Comes with Yorkshire pud and creamed horseraddish!

12 thoughts on “Where can you get "Prime Rib of Beef" in London ?

  1. PhD says:

    Deart Paddy this not the case. Of course you can get ‘prime rib’ in the UK. There are, however, many regional variations in how meat is cut.
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  2. abercrombieandfitchlvr123 says:

    Try Burger King.
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  3. Chianti Man says:

    Any decent butcher can do that
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  4. malta1943 says:

    Keep me posted – I love prime rib Stateside style and have never seen it in any restaurant in London.
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  5. Ak23566 says:

    OK – now I know what you mean. You just want "Rib of Beef".

    This is commonly available from any good butcher. I have actually bought a rib for Christmas Day. Here is the web address of the butcher I use. They specialise in mail order too:

    http://www.donaldrussell.com/product.cfm?productid=154&pageid=1
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  6. lozatron says:

    Hey

    You should try Bodeans in Soho.

    Good luck in your quest.
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  7. SAM B says:

    You are really looking for "rib of beef". The prime part isn’t anything to do with the cut of meat, just that it was a prime beef animal. You can either eat it on the bone or as rolled rib with the bone removed. The common name in the UK for rib is chine.
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  8. RexRazor says:

    Prime Rib is far and away the most delicious piece of beef known to mankind. I feel for you, really I do, and I wish could help. I’m here in the eastern part of the United States, and Prime Rib is very popular in the Mid-Atlantic States like Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland and in the midwest and Texas of course.

    It is the most tasteful of all "steaks" because it is marbleized. Unlike most pieces of beef or steaks, the fat is even edible and delicious if your heart can stand it.

    All American butchers have Prime Rib roasts available for purchase and we are having one on New Year’s Eve. Here’s what’s really unbelievable–we got a 10 lb. roast for just $50 on sale. That’s 10, 16 oz. steaks for just $50. It would cost $200 in a restaurant, at least.

    The UK needs to get its act together. This was one of the favorite foods of the American Founding Fathers who came from England–Ben Franklin specifically. Some butcher has to know what you are talking about. You can do this at home–no problem–just roast it and buy a meat thermometer to make sure it’s done to your liking. 150 degrees Fahrenheit, I think, for medium. Good luck in your restaurant search. I can’t imagine having this problem. I would lose my mind. I order it every time I go out to eat because it is so amazing.
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  9. sweet_nili2000 says:

    Try the oldest pub/restaurant in London – Rules – went there the other day and my friend had Rib of Beef – looked spectacular!!! Comes with Yorkshire pud and creamed horseraddish!
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    http://www.rules.co.uk/

  10. Sven B says:

    Maxim’s de Paris
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  11. jessica_l222 says:

    It looks like Sweet Nil above nailed it.

    I live in the U.S. and Prime Rib is often served with horseradish and au jus for the beef along with Yorkshire pudding so it sounds like her friend did indeed have it at that restaurant–Rules. I didn’t see it on their menu, so I’d call them to make sure. As my friend Rex says above, Prime Rib was and remains a huge favorite in the United States dating back to the Founding Fathers from England–Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin etc. and they loved it with horseradish and Yorkshire pudding. If you are ever in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where the Founding Fathers spent much of their time, Prime Rib is found in almost every restaurant with a continental menu. In that same region, it is also sliced thin and used to make the famous Philadelphia Cheesesteak sandwich which is insanely good and popular . It’s ribeye steak sliced thin, placed on an Italian long roll with cheese, and often smothered in mushrooms and onions. Thousands of people stand in line for these sandwiches every weekend at Pat’s and Geno’s Cheesesteaks in Southern Philadelphia.
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    "Heritage of America Cookbook" for reference to Benjamin Franklin’s love of Prime Rib and Yorkshire Pudding, and the Philadelphia Cheesesteak.

  12. DBB says:

    I agree that Sweet Nil seems to have found a restaurant for you. Sweet Nil’s friend definitely had what is typically called "Prime Rib" in the United States. Sometimes it’s also called "Standing Rib Roast" or "Rib-eye steak" (sometimes "bone-in" and sometimes not).

    As Jessica says, if you are in the United States, it is wildly popular in restaurants in the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania area and southern part of New Jersey, just east of Philadelphia. I had a "King Sized" Prime Rib one time that was 20 ounces–it’s amazing that such a big, thick piece of beef can be so tender every single time. You can literally cut it with a butter knife if prepared properly.
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