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Tuff or chewe meat is it, raw over cook or just bad quality?

I hear chef Ramsay say it is chewe becuase it over cook, can that be or just not cook good.

I can take a cheap and tough cut of meat and cook it so it comes out tender. I can take a good and expensive cut of meat and turn it into shoe leather. There’s so many things to take into account. If I have a roast, I let it come up to room temp on the counter before cooking. I also let meat "rest" for about 15-20 minutes before serving. It gives it time to settle so that when it’s sliced, or cut into, all the juices don’t drain out from the meat leaving it dry. It’s a matter of knowing what cut of meat needs to be cooked in which manner for the best and most tender results. As for the "Chef," he is a pompous one IMO. You don’t see him eating cheap now do you?

4 thoughts on “Tuff or chewe meat is it, raw over cook or just bad quality?

  1. Luv2Cook says:

    over cooked and not tenderized. Some cuts of meat need to cook on low heat to render the meat tender, like pork ribs.
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  2. Mr.Boomby Mungbean. says:

    it depends on so many things. For example, when cooking steak, you should remove it from the fridge at least 30mins before cooking to let it relax. Obviously some cuts are far more tender than cheaper cuts. Marinating, method of cooking and yes, overcooked meat is tougher. The trick is to keep everything succulent. That can be done by basting or cooking at the right temperature. Always try and cook meat slowly and for a longer time.
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  3. UwishUknewMyName says:

    Its either over cooked, bad quality, or a combo of both
    References :

  4. DipSchittz says:

    I can take a cheap and tough cut of meat and cook it so it comes out tender. I can take a good and expensive cut of meat and turn it into shoe leather. There’s so many things to take into account. If I have a roast, I let it come up to room temp on the counter before cooking. I also let meat "rest" for about 15-20 minutes before serving. It gives it time to settle so that when it’s sliced, or cut into, all the juices don’t drain out from the meat leaving it dry. It’s a matter of knowing what cut of meat needs to be cooked in which manner for the best and most tender results. As for the "Chef," he is a pompous one IMO. You don’t see him eating cheap now do you?
    References :

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