Quality Pork

Perfect Easy Home BBQ’d Ribs

A simple way to create a restaurant quality pork rib experience in your own home, but to do it at less then half the price. A few minutes to start the oven braise, followed by a few more minutes of finishing the racks on the BBQ, and you can have lots of ribs that taste as good as any resturant,.

Duration : 0:4:45

Read more…

1 comment - What do you think?
Posted by mark - September 18, 2017 at 7:16 pm

Categories: Quality Pork   Tags: , , , , ,

Sausage-Wrapped Pork Tenderloin with Chef Albert Di Meglio at Olana Restaurant

http://www.behindtheburner.com The world’s greatest pork recipe is under wraps. Literally! Let Chef Albert Di Meglio teach you his tricks to the tastiest tenderloin you’ll ever try, using the finest, freshest pork from D’Artagnan.

“Tip: Use high-quality, all natural and organic meats such as D’Artagnan.
Trick: Lightly season your meats to bring out natural flavors and don’t forget the power of simple salt and pepper.
Technique: Cut pork tenderloin into 4 oz. pieces per person, be sure to save the ends for future use/flavoring.
Trick: Prepare pork tenderloin at room temperature so meat is pliable.
Tip: Fat is good. A 30% pork fat to lean mean ratio will keep your meat moist and juicy.
Trick: If available, experiment with extras like caul fat (which will help hold your homemade sausage together). When rolling the sausage, wrap like a Christmas present: neat and tidy.
Trick: If you don’t have time to make the sausage, you can use pre-made sausage (just take it out of the casing)
Tip: “”You don’t have cook pork until it’s dead.”” Medium/medium-rare is perfectly safe and works beautifully.
Trick: Grape seed oil has a higher smoking point and is flavorless, so it won’t obstruct the natural pork and bacon flavors in the dish.
Trick: Raisins will help balance out any bitterness in brussels sprouts.
Technique: Hold the herbs until last, otherwise they will change flavor and color too much.
Tip: If you’re vegetarian, roasted brussels sprouts make a great side dish. Simply skip the bacon, and finish with tofu instead. ”

As the leading purveyor of organic poultry, game, foie gras, pâtés, sausages, smoked delicacies and wild mushrooms in the US, D’Artagnan currently provides more than 400 products to the world’s top chefs, as well as directly to consumers’ tables. Members can enjoy a 10% discount at www.dartagnan.com

Duration : 0:4:48

Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?
Posted by mark - September 16, 2017 at 5:05 pm

Categories: Quality Pork   Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Find Out Where You Can Learn to Make Your Favorite Dishes at Cooking Schools?

Thai cuisine has gained popularity all over the world for its fresh flavours, healthy ingredients and low fat cooking methods for help visit www.cat-head-biscuit.com. At one time recipes in Thailand were divided between those for the royal court (which were kept secret) and those for commoners. Now royal and everyday recipes have mingled but there are still significant regional differences.

In the north of Thailand glutinous rice is favoured over steamed rice and it is kneaded into small balls with the fingers and used to soak up liquid dishes. Northern curries have a milder, more herbal quality thanthose in the south. Curries are flavoured with ginger, tamarind and turmeric. Preserved fruits and pickled vegetables are popular accompaniments. The traditional meal served when entertaining in the north is a Khantok dinner. Khan meaning bowl and tok meaning a low round table. Guests sit on the floor around the table and help themselves to a variety of dishes which may include rice, fried chicken, a curry, a minced meat dish and a salad. The north is famous for longans (a lychee-like fruit) when in season.

In the south coconut features in many dishes and locally grown cashew nuts are eaten as appetisers or stir-fried with chicken and dried chillis. As you may expect, there is an abundance of seafood. Around the Gulf of Thailand shellfish are farmed and so they are very fresh. Whole fish are sometimes brought to the table still poaching in heavily seasoned stock over a charcoal burner. The result is pleasantly aromatic rather than intensely spicy.

However, the type of cuisine with which we are most familiar comes from the central region of Thailand and dates from the early 13th century when the first independent Thai capital was located at Sukhothai. The basic diet consisted of rice, fish and vegetables flavoured with black pepper and fish sauce, along with fresh fruits. When power later transferred south to Ayuthaya other ingredients such as coriander, lime and tomato were added to the diet, along with what has become an essential ingredient – chilli pepper. Other influences came from India, Japan, Persia and China.
Thai Cooking Classes
Northern Thailand

The internationally renowned Chiang Mai Thai Cookery School is owned and run by Sompon Nabnian, Thailand’s international TV chef, and his wife Elizabeth. Stay and Study packages are offered at the Jasmine Rice Village which is operated by the owners of the Chiang Mai Thai Cookery School for help visit www.150-venison-recipes.com. “A half hour’s drive from Chiang Mai city centre, Jasmine Rice Village Boutique Resort and Spa offers a unique experience for visitors seeking tranquility, cultural authenticity and luxurious comfort during their stay in the north of Thailand”.

1-5 day classes are offered. A one-day class costs 990 Baht (33 USD) per person.
Southern Thailand

At Mom Tri’s Boathouse in Phuket, Gourmet Executive Chef Tummanoon Punchun shares the secrets of great Thai cooking at popular workshops held every Saturday and Sunday from 10.00 to about 14.00. The course includes a folder of recipes, a Boathouse apron and lunch. Excellent beach front resort accommodation is available.

2 day class costs 3,200 Baht (105 USD) per person.
Central Thailand

From Bangkok, The Thai House is a forty minute long-boat trip through the villages along Klong Bangkok Noi. Owned by a Thai family, this beautiful, traditional teak house is surrounded by gardens with tropical fruit trees and its own herb garden. Homestay accommodation is available in guestrooms around an upstairs courtyard. Pip, your instructor, learned to cook from the highest possible authority – her mother.

1-3 day classes are offered. A one-day class costs 3,500 Baht (115 USD) per person

Typical one-day course at The Thai House includes:

An introduction to Thai herbs and spices

Appetizer: Larb Moo – A spicy Thai pork salad

Soup: Tom Yam Kung – Hot and sour prawn soup

Luncheon Dish: Phad Thai – Thai fried noodles

Main Dishes: Kaeng Ka-Ri Kai – Yellow chicken curry and Paneang Nua – Coconut Beef Curry

boparaisk
http://www.articlesbase.com/recipes-articles/find-out-where-you-can-learn-to-make-your-favorite-dishes-at-cooking-schools-714341.html

Be the first to comment - What do you think?
Posted by mark - September 15, 2017 at 4:20 pm

Categories: Quality Pork   Tags: , , , , , ,

real meat versus canned food?

I have two 9-week-old kittens. They are currently on wet food about 5 times a day. They have dry food out all the time that they nibble on. Water is provided which they are drinking.

They are currently being weaned off Whiskas and Felix wet food (which they were fed in foster care) and onto a higher quality wet food. I am mixing some Pets at Home (UK) "Purely" food which seems better quality. It has 50% real chicken, sunflower oil, vitamin and mineral supplements and tapioca starch. That’s the list of ingredients. It seems better than other brands. There doesn’t seem to be any byproducts or ash or corn fillers.

The kittens don’t seem to enjoy this food that much (both higher and lower quality food), but they will pick at it. A couple of times I have given them some salmon steaks and frying steak (both cooked) which I’ve chopped up. They love this and lick the plate clean!

My question is, is it wrong/safe/unhealthy to feed them exclusively real meat (beef, pork, tuna etc) as opposed to high quality canned food? I know that canned food has all the vitamins and minerals, etc that a cat needs, but is real meat actually better for them since they are carnivores? I am a little worried about them having too much protein in their diet as I know this can cause kidney problems. Also, because they are so young, is real meat appropriate? I would not feed them processed meats (ham, deli meat etc). I know that canned food contains water, but they are drinking pretty well too.

I want to give my kittens a good start in life and feed them the best.
Thanks for the answers I’ve been getting. So, what about if I give them a combination of real and canned food, all mixed in together. The real meat might make the canned stuff taste better. But then again, they might just pick out the real stuff and leave the canned stuff!

A raw diet is the best thing you could possibly feed them. They are obligate carnivores and designed to digest high protein foods, so you needn’t worry about kidney problems. Meat contains water just like canned food does.

Making a nutritionally complete homemade diet isn’t easy. Research:
http://www.catinfo.org/makingcatfood.htm (MAKING CAT FOOD)
http://www.catnutrition.org/foodmaking.php (Foodmaking)
http://www.littlebigcat.com/index.php?action=library&act=show&item=014 (Easy Homemade Diets for Cats and Dogs)

Raw feeding is an excellent option but should also be thoroughly researched before being attempted. There’s a lot more to it than just feeding your cat raw meat. You need a careful balance of raw muscle meat, raw organ meat, and raw meaty bones. Research:
http://www.rawfedcats.org/ (Raw Fed Cats)
http://rawfed.com/myths/cats.html (Raw Fed: What About Cats?)
http://www.rawlearning.com/ (Jane Anderson’s Raw Learning Site)
http://www.rawmeatybones.com/ (Raw Meaty Bones)
http://rawfed.com/myths/preymodel.html (Raw Prey Model Diet Vs. BARF Diet)
http://community.livejournal.com/rawdogs/profile/ (Raw Dogs Livejournal Community [not just for dogs despite the name!], excellent raw feeding information on the profile page and overall helpful community for raw feeding questions.)
http://www.rawfed.com/myths/index.html (Myths About Raw Feeding)

Darksong~

7 comments - What do you think?
Posted by mark - September 10, 2017 at 10:21 am

Categories: Quality Pork   Tags: , , , , , , , ,

So with the Quality of Food decreasing… What will we Eat?

Can’t eat pork,
Swine flu…

Can’t eat chicken,
Bird flu.

Can’t eat Beef,
Mad cow….

Can’t eat eggs,
Salmonella.

Can’t eat fish,
heavy metal poisons in their waters.

Can’t eat fruits and veggies,
insecticides and herbicides.

Hmmmmmmmmm!!!!!!!!!!!!!

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

*PANICKS*

WHAT THE HECK IS THERE TO EAT!!!!???

Well…
Cooking takes care of salmonella, swine flu and bird flu.

Organic fruits and veggies are supposed ly insecticide and herbicide free.

Heavy metals can be minimized by avoiding certain fish.

The only thing questionable is mad cow… There’s no definitive cause for mad cow.

No need to panic. There’s plenty to eat.

7 comments - What do you think?
Posted by mark - September 9, 2017 at 9:13 am

Categories: Quality Pork   Tags:

Rusty Ryan from Hatfield Quality Meats on the 10! Show 3-06-09

Rusty Ryan from Hatfield Quality Meats shares Easter Ham glaze recipe on NBC’s 10! Show on 3-06-09

Duration : 0:4:57

Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?
Posted by mark - September 7, 2017 at 6:51 pm

Categories: Quality Pork   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Hatfield Quality Meats – Share the Goodness Pork Tenderloin Commercial

Hatfield Quality Meats Share the Goodness Pork Tenderloin Commercial

Duration : 0:0:32

Read more…

Be the first to comment - What do you think?
Posted by mark - September 5, 2017 at 5:48 pm

Categories: Quality Pork   Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Can you get swine flue if you ate an infected pig?

Holla, I’m from Philippines, so far the swine flu hasn’t reached us yet. No suspicion has arisen. Anyway, I have eaten some pork meat, grilled, I think very well. So here are some questions. Can you get the flu if you eat an infected(Cooked) Pig? and is it possible that the pig is imported from an infected country? If so, does the gov. check the pig’s quality before they export them?

No. You cannot get swine flu from eating an infected pig.

5 comments - What do you think?
Posted by mark - September 4, 2017 at 12:51 am

Categories: Quality Pork   Tags:

How to get cooked meat to be tender?

Occasionally a piece of meat, pork, beef or lamb, no matter how well cooked will be tough because it was bad quality to begin with, coming probably from an old animal well past its prime (I know what cuts of beef must be boiled, roasted or fried so that’s not a problem).

But if starting from good meat what are the tips and advice for cooking it tender? As I understand a bad cooking method can make even the best quality meat tough like leather.

slow cook it. you can do it in the oven without a slow cooker. i do london broil at 275 for 4 hours (after searing it on the stove) and i almost cover it with water. then i make a gravy out of the water after it is cooked. mmmm delicious and it falls apart.

also, after cooking meat, cut it against the grain. it is easier to chew.

13 comments - What do you think?
Posted by mark - August 28, 2017 at 4:42 pm

Categories: Quality Pork   Tags:

How can i make this recipe healthier…?

Ingredients
1 tbsp vegetable oil
16 good-quality pork and herb sausages
2 large onions, sliced
2 celery sticks, chopped
12 rashers smoked streaky bacon, chopped
2 tbsp plain flour
2 tbsp tomato purée
330ml bottle Guinness
300ml beef stock, hot
250g chestnut mushrooms, halved
3 tbsp fresh parsley leaves, to garnish

Per serving:
498kcals
39g fat (13g saturated)
21.1g protein
16.9g carbs
5.7g sugar
3.6g salt

I’ve already taken out the bacon…not sure how that will reduce the salt and fat content. I like the idea of the guiness for flavour and its good for iron (thats my story and im sticking to it!) I also plan to use reduced fat sausage, wll probably half the sausage amount and up the veg amount instead as well…but not sure about how this will effect calories etc…

Overall i like traditional foods but my boyfriend and i are going on a healthy food kick and trying to put more veg in our diet…any advice or similar recipies would greatly appreciate it. Thanks.

Try these substitutions:
-use turkey sausage (I would keep same amount since you cut out the bacon)
-use low-fat, sodium-free beef broth
-use olive oil

I’m not familiar with stout, but do they have light version of this?

You can add more veggies – carrots sound good with this.

Add salt after the cooking, if you need it.

5 comments - What do you think?
Posted by mark - August 27, 2017 at 2:26 am

Categories: Quality Pork   Tags:

Next Page »