Cooking Quality Meats

Making Delicious Smoked Meats With A Propane Smoker

People all over the world enjoy the rich and earthy taste of smoked meat and fish. This form of cooking foods has a long history and helps to ensure that the meat can be eaten safely and with a wonderful flavor. There are many hobbyists who enjoy using a smoker at home to make their own smoked meats and other items. A vast amount of these smoker enthusiasts use a propane smoker for all their gourmet meal preparations. Propane smokers have a number of advantages and disadvantages, as well, when compared to other types of smokers.

Using A Propane Smoker For Your Smoking Needs

One obvious advantage of using the propane smoker to prepare an array of smoked foods is that the propane is readily available and can be taken anywhere. This mobility allows a person to carry the smoker with them on vacations or in remote areas. A propane tank is easily attached to the smoker to provide the fuel that it needs to do a proper job on cooking the meats. With the electric type of smoker, there is always the concern of a power outage, and in this case, the smoker would quit and the meat would spoil in the meantime.

Propane smokers usually come with a heavy door and several grids on the interior which hold the meat, fish, turkey or chicken in place while it is being smoked. The door opening allows wood or water to be easily added during the smoking process and allows someone easy access to checking on the status of the food itself. A cast iron smoker box is a popular feature, as well as a porcelain-covered water pan. Each of these features help to ensure that the food will be cooked to smoking perfection.

As with every item available on the market, some propane smokers are more expensive than others, and the price usually varies depending on the size and quality of the smoker. $150 to $200 is an approximate price to pay for a propane smoker that can be enjoyed in one’s home to create anything from the most traditional of barbeques to an exotic meal of exquisitely smoked fish. Having a gathering or party at one’s home can be especially exciting with a simple smoker to keep everyone coming back for more. The aroma of the meat or fish while smoking is a wonderful scent. Overall, these handy tools make a great addition to any meat-lover’s home.

Ann Marier
http://www.articlesbase.com/advice-articles/making-delicious-smoked-meats-with-a-propane-smoker-128039.html

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Posted by mark - June 28, 2017 at 6:39 pm

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How to cook great BBQ Meat with quality produce

This video tells us about Coorong Angus Beef, which is restaurant quality Angus Beef which is avaliable direct to all consumers through Feast! Fine Food stores.

The video also provides tips on cooking your steak to perfection on a barbecue. Additionally the video tells us why many of the lesser known cuts of beef (e.g Blade) can still provide a very tasty result.

The video also looks at ‘Marbling’ which occurs with Coorong Angus Beef. It explains what it is and how it intensifies the flabour of the beef.

Coorong Angus Beef as well as many other cuts of branded beef are avaliable at all Feast! Fine Foods stores. Check us out online at www.feastfinefoods.com.au

Duration : 0:3:1

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Posted by mark -  at 5:43 am

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Meat Loaf – Modern Girl – Live 1985

Not sure if this is already up, but it’s a very high quality live recorded performance of the underrated classic “Modern Girl” sung by Meat Loaf.

Duration : 0:5:19

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Posted by mark - June 25, 2017 at 2:08 pm

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Steak- What do you Recommend And Why?

Can anyone explain to me the quality, taste, cost etc. of different types of steak? I don’t really know anything about meat quality, but I want to get the highest quality steak (for a reasonable price) for my dad’s birthday. I’m looking at Omaha Steaks and I just realized I have no idea what to look for! What would you recommend and why? Also, what would be the most impressive?

My dad loves to cook and barbecue, but he’s cheap so I’m ordering him expensive marinated meat– so no restaurant recommendations please! 🙂

I want to know about:

1) Filet Mignon
2) Prime Rib
3) Sirloin
4) T-bone
5) Strip Steak
6) Rib-eye

If he likes his steaks well-done, you may want to stick with the Rib-eye; it has a higher fat content therefore will retain more moisture and flavor. If he is eating his steak at a medium or more rare doneness then I would recommend the Filet Mignon or Porterhouse (most expensive, readily available cuts). I personally think Porterhouse has more flavor and a good combination of meat with the bone-in and you get a piece of Filet Mignon on one side of the bone and a Strip Steak on the other side of the bone ( I save the super tender Filet side to eat last). So obviously, a more economical but still yummy steak is a Strip Steak. Rib-eye, T-bone and Sirloin are OK and just a note on Prime Rib; cooking time would be a good bit longer (larger cut of meat) and is generally served with a very pink center (rare to med rare) if that is a concern for his meat-eating preferences

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Posted by mark - June 24, 2017 at 12:39 pm

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Knowing More About Japanese Sushi

Japanese sushi is a type of vinegar rice topped with fish, meats and vegetables. Nowadays, sushi is prepared creatively for a more inviting appearance. It possesses many nutritional benefits.

Sushi comes from an archaic grammatical form of word which means sour. Rice and fish is being combined for a more likable meal. Most restaurants today serve sushi in different ways. Here is some additional information about one of the most popular food not only in Japan but in many countries across the globe.

Sushi Origin

Sushi did not actually originate in Japan. It was introduced into Japan from China during the 17th century. People made sushi from fermented fish. This is since there were no refrigerators back then.

The fish was consumed and the rice is discarded. Sushi is even considered as the marriage of vinegar rice with many other ingredients. Different sushi combinations had actually evolved. Sushi became the most popular food in Japan until now.

The Japanese love sushi, especially if it is served in rolled nori called Makizushi and nigirizushi (toppings laid in clumps of rice). This is also for inarizushi (stuffed with fried tofu) and chirashi-zushi (toppings scattered over a sushi rice bowl).

One should learn the basic ingredients in preparing sushi. Ingredients should be properly set in order so as to achieve the perfect art of making sushi.

Ingredients:

Sushi rice – This is a type of short grained rice mixed with vinegar, salt, sugar and sometimes sake. Short grain brown and wild rice can also be used and is usually cooled down before placing it into a type of filling.

Nori – Nori is an alga, a type of seaweed wrapper. Algae are scraped, rolled out into thin and dried into the sun just like rice paper. High quality Nori must be thick, shiny, smooth, and green, having no holes on it. The Nori standard sheet is about 18 cm by 21 cm.

Omelette (fukusazushi) -An omelet is used in forming the pouch for the fillings and rice. It may also replace the nori, for wrapping purposes.

Toppings and fillings may include fish, seafood, vegetables, red meat, tofu and eggs.

Condiments

Shoyu – This is referred to as murasaki. It is more commonly known as soy sauce.

Wasabi – This is made from the grated root of the wasabi plant. Hon wasabi (real wasabi) may reduce food poisoning because of its anti-microbial properties. However, seiyo-wasabi (imitation wasabi) is made from mustard powder and horseradish.

Gari – This is a sweet pickled ginger which aids in the digestive processes. It actually cleanses the palate.

Ocha – This is a type of green tea (ocha) in Japan.

Nutritional information

The main ingredients of sushi which is rice and fish are naturally low in fat but are high in carbohydrates, protein, vitamins and minerals.

• Fats: Rich in Omega 3 or unsaturated fat. No fat was introduced in making sushi because it is served raw.
• Proteins: High levels of protein are found in tofu, seafood, egg and most specially fish.
• Vitamins and Minerals: Gari, nori and many other vegetables are rich in nutrients.
• Carbohydrates: Found in vegetables and mainly rice.

Risks in Health

Fish such as tuna and bluefin is found to have high levels of mercury. It can be hazardous to one’s health when eaten in large quantities. A weekly dose should acquire 2 to 6 pieces depending on the person’s weight as well as the amount of tuna inside the sushi. Raw seafood may result to risks of anisakiasis, causing diarrhea, parasitic infection and poisoning, especially if not prepared properly.

Etiquette

Sushi can be eaten via chopsticks or with your bare hands. This can be served with desired condiments like wasabi, soy sauce and pickled ginger.

Utensils

• Fukin: Kitchen cloth.
• Ryoribashi: Cooking chopsticks.
• Hangiri: Rice barrel.
• Hocho: Kitchen knives.
• Makisu: Bamboo rolling mat.
• Shamoji: Wooden rice paddle.
• Oshizushihako: a mold used to make oshizushi.
• Makiyakinabe: Rectangular omelet pan.

David H. Urmann
http://www.articlesbase.com/food-and-beverage-articles/knowing-more-about-japanese-sushi-678063.html

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Posted by mark - June 20, 2017 at 8:25 pm

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Cumbrae’s Great Alternative Grilling Steaks, Part 2

GREAT ALTERNATIVE GRILLING STEAKS

In this video, Cumbrae’s owner Stephen Alexander gives you the insight into the relatively unexplored world of alternative grilling steaks. We explore the part of the animal the cuts come from, how to best prepare them and how to ask for and select the best one for your individual palate.

These alternative grilling steaks are important to Cumbrae’s nose-to-tail eating philosophy and sustainable farming practices. Not to mention, they are also great value at half the price of premium cuts and are a great way to serve steak at a big summer BBQ. Enjoy!

The Cumbrae’s tradition of farm-to-fork quality started over a decade ago when third-generation butcher Stephen Alexander first brought Cumbrae Farms’ naturally raised meats to Toronto’s food connoisseurs.

Cumbrae’s has become Toronto’s meeting place for people who love to buy, prepare and eat great food. For leading chefs, ardent connoisseurs and families who value quality, Cumbrae’s enthusiastic staff set the standard for personal service, great cooking advice and true enjoyment of food.

Read more about Cumbraes farm-to-fork philosophy at www.cumbraes.com

Created by Neil Mills and Stephen Alexander

Duration : 0:8:15

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Posted by mark - June 15, 2017 at 1:22 pm

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How To Do Ribeye Steaks On The Barbecue Grill

Looking for that perfect steak for your next BBQ? The Grill Masters at all http://www.BarbecueWeb.com have some “tips and tricks” to help you easily serve up the “best steak anywhere” bar none, the Rib Eye steak. Why the Rib Eye? The Rib Eye steak, or ribeye, also known as the Delmonico or Scotch Fillet (Australia), is a beef steak from the small end of the rib roast. When the Rib Eye section of the beef is cut into steaks, it is one of the most popular, tender and juiciest steaks available. This is because the meat from the rib section is tender and fattier or “marbled” more than most other parts of the steer. This extra fat makes Rib Eye steaks and roasts especially tender and flavorful. The Rib Eye steak is usually served bone-in, particularly at high quality steakhouses -the extra moisture and fat alongside the bone enhances the flavor. So get yourself some 1 to 11/2 lb and 11/2″-2″ thick Rib Eye steaks –and then go “fire up” that BBQ grill of yours -it’s time for some real S T E A K On The Barbecue. And be sure to check out more easy and delicious recipes from the Barbecue Web on Google Video, or of course at www.BarbecueWeb.com

Duration : 0:7:16

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Posted by mark - June 14, 2017 at 11:36 am

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Cooking a rack of lamb

Learn how to cook a restaurant quality rack of lamb. This video will give you an understanding of how to fry and cook meats in general making your meat softer and full of flavour.

Duration : 0:5:19

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Posted by mark - June 12, 2017 at 9:05 am

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Cumbrae’s Great Alternative Grilling Steaks, Part 3

GREAT ALTERNATIVE GRILLING STEAKS

In this video, Cumbrae’s owner Stephen Alexander gives you the insight into the relatively unexplored world of alternative grilling steaks. We explore the part of the animal the cuts come from, how to best prepare them and how to ask for and select the best one for your individual palate.

These alternative grilling steaks are important to Cumbrae’s nose-to-tail eating philosophy and sustainable farming practices. Not to mention, they are also great value at half the price of premium cuts and are a great way to serve steak at a big summer BBQ. Enjoy!

The Cumbrae’s tradition of farm-to-fork quality started over a decade ago when third-generation butcher Stephen Alexander first brought Cumbrae Farms’ naturally raised meats to Toronto’s food connoisseurs.

Cumbrae’s has become Toronto’s meeting place for people who love to buy, prepare and eat great food. For leading chefs, ardent connoisseurs and families who value quality, Cumbrae’s enthusiastic staff set the standard for personal service, great cooking advice and true enjoyment of food.

Read more about Cumbraes farm-to-fork philosophy at www.cumbraes.com

Created by Neil Mills and Stephen Alexander

Duration : 0:7:25

Read more…

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Posted by mark - June 7, 2017 at 2:18 am

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ive bought some really good quality duck breasts and need some new suggestions?

normally i pan fry and then oven them with sea salt and pepper and have it with chinese pancakes and plum sauce but im looking for a better recipe idea – id prefer not to add any other meat to the dish and like them to be cooked whole as i love them like a pink colour in the middle but im all out of ideas any suggestions and recipes would be great thx

this is how i do them sometimes so you shall require 1 tot of casis 2 ounces of fresh blackcurrants a quarter of a pint of stock 1 Glass of good dry white wine put the blackcurrants in to a skillet and heat the pan up ad the cassis flambe it and when the flames die down add the stock and wine season to taste and simmer until it has reduced by half now if you have a griddle all the better heat it up until it smokes then place the duck breasts skin side down and cook for 3 minuets and turn them over and cook for 2 minuets remove from the griddle and rest for five minuets now strain the sauce correct the seasoning and pour some on to the plates slice the duck breasts and place on to the sauce with whatever you prefer potato veg or salad whatever it is that you like best this is simply a superb way of serving duck breasts and unlike some i did read that it was a recipe for the breast not a whole duck and as i am a chef i can tell you that yes i have cooked this dish professionally many times and all ways get compliments for it

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Posted by mark - June 6, 2017 at 2:12 pm

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